DFA
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Competitions

DFA is constantly pushing ourselves to create new and exciting solutions for the Architecture and Design community, these are a few of our most recent competition entries ranging from hospitality design, fixture design and sustainable solutions for the future.

Seed Cone Pavilion

Seed Cone Pavilion

Governor's Island, New York City
Client: FIGMENT NYC
Status: Selected as one of five teams as a finalist

What if we could build a temporary structure that actually dissolved to leave a garden in its absence? The Seed Cone Pavilion is inspired by the cone of the Pitch Pine Tree native to Governor’s Island.  We conceived a reusable, transportable structure that is recharged to restore indigenous plant life to any context in which it is placed.  The Pavilion’s form easily accommodates varied programs and events such as musical performances and educational classes, in addition to providing simple, elegant shelter from sun, wind, and rain.  The pavilion pays homage to the island's history by leaving a planted footprint that grows, expands and blurs over time, contributing to the natural landscape, and supporting local insects and fauna for many seasons beyond Summer 2017.

 

Helio Light Concept

Helio Light Concept

Helio is a multi faceted light concept whose modular design and arrayed configurations glow with the subtly striking spectrum of colors observed in the cosmos.  Helios modules can be combined to take on endless shapes and formations to suit its context: rigorous, orderly and architectural or with a constellation-like freedom. Just as a star's brightness cycles over time, so can Helio's. One Helio module is like a lone star, emanating light with variable, user controlled intensity from a single antenna. When Helios are installed in arrays, they transcend mere function and become functional art installations that embody the ever-changing beauty of the cosmos.  The intensity of the indirect light of each module can be adjusted from dim to bright depending on the positioning of the antenna. The design of Helio is simple and modern, and when illuminated, casts the mysterious glow of the night’s sky in any interior environment.

 

Skip Stone House

Skip Stone House

The Skip Stone House was created for DFA’s entry into Branch Technology’s Freeform Home Design Challenge where participants were asked to combine function and creativity to utilize the technology of 3D Printing and design the first 3D printed home.  DFA’s submission was based off simplicity, elegance, and most importantly, efficiency.

A stone ricochets off the water’s surface, the impact causes a momentary displacement of water and surface tension propels it along in a series of seemingly impossible steps. This is the moment – the pleasure and efficient simplicity of that first successful leap – that informs the design of the Skip Stone house.

The carved ground plane appears displaced by the inertia of the home alighting upon it and accommodates off-street parking. An adjacent stair slices into the ground and light from the level above welcomes residents to ascend from the car park.

The shell of the home is conceived as a gently folded plane with the outward presence of a river rock: just the right combination of flat and smooth, and worn round in all the right places. The tesselated skin, comprised of BIPV panels, ceramic tile and green roof modular elements nods to the possibility of such a stone’s more crystalline past. The secondary enclosure system is comprised of a folding ribbon wall of glass. A service core longitudinally bisects the home’s interior into public and private spaces and is the distribution and circulation point for HVAC, plumbing and hydronic radiant floors, and electricity. Storage, bathing and cooking functions also quietly reside in the core and the bed and counter space carve out territories in its center.

Olympic Pavilion

Olympic Pavilion

London, England

DFA’s submission for the 2012 Olympic Pavilion in Trafalgar Square incorporates interactive multi-media design, as well as basic concessions for event tickets, information, and food. The structure is fully self sustaining, and consistent with competition guidelines that the pavilion have a ‘net-zero’ energy footprint. The entire structure is wrapped in a rubber skin, and electricity is generated as visitors circulate over its lead zirconate titanium (PZT) surfaces. The ‘green’ roof of the pavilion collects rainwater which contributes to a grey water system, and additional surfaces support a photovoltaic membrane for added power generation. Large screens on the exterior of the pavilion face the steps of the National Gallery, and an outdoor amphitheater is created where onlookers can watch live events, as well as information being broadcast regarding the Games.