DFA
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Residential

A small selection of residential projects, for a full portfolio email us at info@d-form-a.com

250 Wynwood

250 Wynwood

Miami, Florida
Area: 36,000 Square Feet
Status: Completed December 2015

 

Co-op Lobby

Co-op Lobby

New York City
Area: 1,200 Square Feet
Status: Completed in 2011

 

19th Street Rooftop

19th Street Rooftop

New York City
Area: 300 Square Feet
Status: Completed in 2011

 

Noe House

Noe House

San Francisco

Noe House was Laith Sayigh’s first solo project.  After spending years working in some of the world’s most prestigious architecture firms, Laith designed and finished his first residential project.  He was commissioned by a couple who had recently bought a beautiful Victorian Classic ‘Painted Lady’ house located in the Castro District of San Francisco.  The owners wanted to preserve and restore the historic street front facing part of the house but also create a modern and contemporary interior and backyard living environment.

 

Triplex Handrail

Triplex Handrail

New York, NY

For this three level combination triplex in Manhattan’s esteemed pre-war Ansonia co-op, DFA was challenged to create a staircase that would unify the three units while adhering to the narrow footprint prescribed. The challenge was to create a seamless design that incorporated a railing that wasn’t to too bulky and big. The result was a ribbon of inch white Corian, carefully applied to the staircase. The existing stairs were re-clad in walnut.

 

Noyac Path

Noyac Path

Long Island, NY

A nod to both the classic Long Island beach house and contemporary minimalist architecture, the design for the Noyac Pathhouse bisects an existing farm house down its center, and marries the two themes seamlessly to reflect the converging tastes of the husband-and-wife client.  The pre-existing structure, which was largely demolished, is cut down its central axis, and shifted lengthwise to create two distinct structures. At the front of the house, DFA designed architecture which referenced typical beach houses; a pitched roofline, vaulted dormer windows, and cedar shingles. To the rear, the architecture is much more stark, and the space minimalist. The two opposing sections are married in a communal atrium, which houses the ‘heart’ of the home’s living space: the family room and kitchen. The building incorporates several energy efficient systems, including a photovoltaic membrane for energy generation and geo-thermal heating systems. With a push towards net-zero energy consumption, DFA hoped to execute the project such that it may be removed from the local grid.